DESIGNER COLUMNS & BLOGS / Architecture Is Fun

Posted in Architecture Is Fun on May 27, 2014 10:36 am EDT

God Is In The Details: #BIM

#SmartArchitects #TheFuture #SacredSpaces. What role do you play?


 

MORE ENTRIES FROM THIS BLOG

 
 

LATEST ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION

 
 

NEWSLETTERS

 

Sign up for our bi-monthly newsletter Designer Today to stay up to date with all we do at Designer and with what's going on in the field of house of worship architecture.

 
 
  
          
 

print
TAGS: architecture, bim, business,

print

By Peter Exley, FAIA, and Sharon Exley, MAAE, ASID

Some of us dabble with similar BIM scenarios as we design homes and sacred projects—monitoring energy use, adjusting thermostats, security systems, opening and closing windows (or watching babysitters) remotely using iPads....

Ponder this scenario: an architect uses BIM (building information modeling) tools to design an airport, but it could just as easily be a sacred space. A significant model is created; one embedded with detail and information on every component and specification of a complexly designed and engineered environment. The model is built collegially with the integrated team. The building completes as scheduled and on a designed budget. It’s an all around love-fest. And then, in our romanticized but real tale, the architect hands over the “keys.”

At a recent conference, an esteemed colleague walked through this precise scenario. The story showed not only the BIM, but the airplanes at the end of the jet-ways in real time with the associated passenger manifests. It even included the airport ground vehicle operations to a level where this live-feed database could pinpoint the meal to be provided for the passenger in seat 12D traveling from ORD to SFO (if it was a church, it might be your café fridge tracking last Sunday’s congregation coffee and muffin sales and suggesting menus via Facebook). The point illustrated by our colleague was the sophistication of this amassed information—its connectivity to the built environment, and its value to airport management (users and tenants). The biggest PLUS? The architect, rather than concluding the client relationship once the building was complete, is still collaborating with the airport, leveraging this model in a real time, profitable relationship that brings extraordinary value—never handing over the keys.

Digital opportunity

Some of us dabble with similar BIM scenarios as we design homes and sacred projects—monitoring energy use, adjusting thermostats, security systems, opening and closing windows (or watching babysitters) remotely using iPads. We’re using digital models to take building components directly to fabrication. Some of us are printing bits of buildings (or dreaming about it). Logistical systems, such as the one described in the airport scenario, have been in place for decades but, for most of us, without the opportunity to integrate it within our core professional services.  continued >>

 

1
2