DESIGNER COLUMNS & BLOGS / From the Editor

Posted in From the Editor on January 20, 2016 9:47 am EST

It’s All About Connection ...

As technology takes over in the way our devices -- and we ourselves -- communicate, is that a good thing? It can be if we let it. It can enhance greater connection all the way around.


 

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TAGS: business, collaboration, communication, relationships, technology,

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By Carol Badaracco Padgett

In either scenario, face-to-face business interaction or in the multidirectional data variety of devices speaking to other devices over a network, neither works to full advantage without a proper connection.

The January/February 2016 issue of Church Designer magazine is dubbed the Design Solutions Issue. As you’ll see in flipping through its pages, whether in the digital edition or when it arrives in your mailbox, a solid first step toward better design solutions is the concept and practice of connection—represented here ranging from a multidirectional data variety (as in the topic of audio networking in the issue's feature on audio networking) to straightforward face-to-face networking with others (as referenced in the Talking Business column on human networking).

The link between the two types of networking may, at first glance, seem arbitrary. But it’s actually intensely interesting. In either scenario, face-to-face business interaction or in the multidirectional data variety of devices speaking to other devices over a network, neither works to full advantage without a proper connection.

Armando Fullwood, executive director of AVL design and integration firm Wave in Harrisburg, N.C., gets this on its most basic level when it comes to dealing with church clients. When interviewed for Church Designer on his firm’s work at Harvester Christian Church in St. Charles, Mo., the issue's featured project, he talks about how his firm came up with technology solutions to meet the church’s need to reach people with multimedia while maintaining a feeling of intimacy, even in a new larger facility and worship space. His surprising insight was this: “Technology is a necessary part of the equation, but it’s not the driving force.” He reports that Wave’s goal in designing and integrating systems is to become better listeners on the human level. “Then we take that emotion and translate it into the proper math that aligns with the budget and the physics of the building.”

Human connection fosters greater linkage and impact through technology; they are not disparate goals.

Writer Christian Doering in the issue's Talking Business column—“How Proficient is Your AEC Firm at Human Networking?”—points to still another reason that the human factor is paramount in the realm of connection, especially when it comes to business: “Without [highly involved relationships] we don’t really have any connection with the fundamental humanity we all share.” If we wish to evolve in our businesses, we must evolve in our relationships. In the end, everyone wins when there’s a stronger connection.

Find Church Designer's Jan/Feb 2016 digital edition here: (visit link)

 

 

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