DESIGNER COLUMNS & BLOGS / From the Editor

Posted in From the Editor on April 4, 2016 9:40 am EDT

Telling Stories

If you're looking to market your firm's services or your own if you work independently, you must reclaim the lost art of storytelling.

Moving into storytelling mode requires that you put down your smart phone or device and think about actual experiences; times when you were right there, in the moment. What happened?


 

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TAGS: blog, business, marketing, sales, storytelling,

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By Carol Badaracco Padgett

On Sunday, March 6, 2016, a CBS Morning show contributor, Faith Salie, reported that in 2015 more people died of selfies than of shark attacks. How could that be, you may wonder? Deaths have occurred when distracted photo-takers crash their cars, fall off cliffs, are attacked by tigers, and all sorts of tragic things.

And then Salie makes this point: selfies are stealing our experiences, our memories of them, and our abilities to tell stories about what happened to us. And whether you’re an individual or a business—an AVL consultant or contractor, an integrator, or an architect—looking to boost the value of your firm through its own unique story, you may find you don’t really know how to begin to tell your story. After all, it’s not something we do that often in a selfie society. But if you’re looking to market your firm’s services or your own if you work independently, it’s a lost art you absolutely must reclaim—if you want to be successful in connecting with others who would consider drawing upon your expertise.

Moving beyond the selfie mentality and into storytelling mode requires that you put down your smart phone or device and think about actual experiences; times when you were right there, in the moment. What happened? How did your company or personal endeavor begin?

Remember the strengths, the challenges, the time of year and who was present, the emotions and drives you had, and commit them to paper.

Remember the strengths, the challenges, the time of year and who was present, the emotions and drives you had, and commit them to paper, or at least to Microsoft Word. Begin to formulate your all-important story.

In the March/April 2016 issue of Church Designer, (visit link), we offer several reads to help you begin to get your story on the boards. First, in Talking Business by contributor Christian Doering, we offer up “Telling Your Story, Authentically” on p. 12. Here, Doering explores why stories work, why they illicit action, how they defeat themselves if they’re not true, and how they bind our customers to us and help us build relationships.

Then, in Think Tank on p. 30, we look at “5 Simple Moves to Improve Your Next Client Presentation” by marketing-savvy contributor Cathy Hutchison. She makes the point that you’d better get your ducks in a row, because if churches are your clients you’ll be presenting to some of the best presenters and storytellers around. “Becoming a better storyteller takes practice,” Hutchison notes.

How will you find the time? Put down the smart phone for your own personal “think tank” session and you may find some you didn’t realize you had.

 

 

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