DESIGNER COLUMNS & BLOGS / Architecture

Posted in Architecture on May 16, 2014 4:56 pm EDT

Why I Design Church Facilities

A Dallas-based veteran architect shares personal career insights and poses questions for peer consideration.


 

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TAGS: architecture, philosophy,

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By Jerry L. Halcomb, FAIA

Digging deeper, sometimes someone will ask me when or why did I decide to plan and design church facilities? A good question.

Have people ever asked you or have you asked yourself, why did you become an architect? Every once in a while, someone will ask me when I knew I wanted to be an architect and why? For me, I just seemed to always know that I wanted to be an architect. Digging deeper, sometimes someone will ask me when or why did I decide to plan and design church facilities? A good question. To be spiritual it would sound great to say, “Well, if you see where God is working, you just go there and get in on the blessings.” But, as you know, that is not always the way we make major decisions.

For me, when I started my practice in 1971, a contractor gave me two design/build projects he had that needed an architect on the team. One of the projects was a small church. In that case, I just needed any job to get the firm started and feed my family. My goal in starting the firm was to do the kind of projects I had experience with at the firm I left to start my architectural practice, which were educational and municipal projects. School projects were near to impossible to get because of politics, so I decided to pursue municipal projects and started taking any project I could get, and I do mean ANY PROJECT, for local municipalities near Dallas. I designed one-hole toilets, park bridges, pavilions, tennis centers, then recreation centers, city pools, fire stations, libraries, and city complexes.  continued >>

 

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