Posted in education on April 2, 2015 2:35 pm EDT

Floorcovering Chameleons

The latest flooring products for high-traffic spaces combine rich hues and textures with functionality, durability, and cleaning ease.


 

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TAGS: ff&e, flooring, interior design, sustainability,

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By Keith Loria

Along with considerations of durability, designers also must consider how flooring contributes to a vibrant, attractive space that helps fuel engagement by those who use it.

Today’s churches are as busy as ever, with many offering multiuse space for community gatherings and business meetings, a special dance, education, scout meetings, and recreation.

With so many different uses going on, flooring needs to be multiuse in its own right. Along with considerations of durability, designers also must consider how flooring contributes to a vibrant, attractive space that helps fuel engagement by those who use it. Auditoriums, of course, must handle large group events, so they need to stand up to high traffic and constant use, while maintaining aesthetic appeal throughout their lifecycle.

Indoor sports floors

One option for church multiuse space is sports flooring. “With a life expectancy of more than 20 years, Taraflex will appeal to architects and designers,” says Elli Kim, marketing manager for Gerflor. “It offers high shock absorption, meets the ASTM F2772 standards for indoor sports floors and offers the highest impact protection [of] any other sports floor in the industry, including rubber, PVC, wood, and Vinyl Composition Tile (VCT).”

Taraflex Sports Flooring in a church multiuse environment. Image courtesy of Gerflor.

For worship spaces, Kim reports that Taraflex is ideal because it resists wear from high traffic as well as indentation from tables, chairs and rolling loads. In addition, she says it’s cost efficient, improves air quality and is offered in a range of new neutral colors and wood designs that can be tailored to any church aesthetic.

Carpet & vinyl options

Wanda Dunaway, director of education and government markets for Shaw Contract Group, says carpet tile is a great option for multiuse spaces for a number of reasons.

Shaw Cut & Compose carpet tiles add acoustic support in what are normally large, cavernous rooms. Image courtesy of Shaw.

“They add acoustic support in what are normally large, cavernous rooms. With furniture being moved around frequently, carpet tiles provide not only a quieter move, but also wreak less havoc on the furniture itself,” she says. “Another benefit to carpet tile is the ability to change out a single tile if a portion of the flooring is damaged by difficult stains, cuts, burns, etc.”

If the church space is being used for food serving also, luxury vinyl tile (LVT) provides another option. Although not as good for acoustics, food and liquids can be easily mopped away from LVT.

“With either option, we are seeing a lot of fun designs to inspire the worshipper—squares, rectangles, and even hexagons, in patterns that set the mood for praise and reflection,” Dunaway says. “Both options also provide more slip resistance than VCT or other shinier options.”

Shaw recommends worship spaces use walk-off carpet tiles at every entrance since the material will protect any flooring option chosen from soiling, staining, and wear.  continued >>

 

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