Posted in education on June 20, 2016 2:06 pm EDT

Thinking Through Infrastructure Needs in Church AV Upgrades

Sooner or later, your church clients will probably choose to upgrade to 4K. How can you ensure that their infrastructure isn't the hold up?


 

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TAGS: av upgrade, business, infrastructure, integration, specification,

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By Ken DeLoria

In planning an infrastructure–a “backbone” –the mantra is clear: It’s less expensive to install a sufficient amount of cabling that can handle today’s highest speed data requirements than to go back and re-do it at a later date.

The equipment using the backbone will include:

• Video: SD, HD, 4K (Standard Definition, High Definition, 4K resolution)

• Audio

• Lighting

• Communications

• Mass Notification and Emergency Communications (MNEC) for churches with campuses

• Security

• Other, not yet anticipated needs

Clearly, if it affects the consumer so broadly, 4K will long since have become the standard for facilities of all kinds, from churches to airports to scholastic settings....

Who saw 4K in video coming? At first it seemed like a ploy of manufacturers to [make] obsolete the present standard—in an attempt to sell more equipment at a high price. Soon, however, surprisingly low prices emerged after the initial stocker shock of the early introductions. The image quality is impeccable, but the need for high-speed data grows exponentially when 4K enters the picture.

Looking ahead has measurable benefits

As the human race continually strives to improve, improve, improve, 4K renders images that are stunningly realistic through projection or fixed-sized screens. Many, if not most, cinemas have adopted 4K projection instead of film because it’s far less expensive than shipping reels of film from exhibitor to exhibitor.

“By 2015, 4K television market share had increased greatly as prices fell dramatically during 2014 and 2015. By 2025, more than half of U.S. households are expected to have a 4K-capable TV, which would be much faster than the technology adoption lifecycle of Full HD,” writes Mark Hoelzel in "Business Insider."

As the human race continually strives to improve, 4K renders images that are stunningly realistic. Image courtesy of Soloman 203.

Clearly, if it affects the consumer so broadly, 4K will long since have become the standard for facilities of all kinds, from churches to airports to scholastic settings, the latter often being in, or associated with, a church. Sooner or later, the client will probably choose to upgrade to 4K, which means [they’ll need to have] the infrastructure in place for the new cameras, the new switchers, recorders, projectors and fixed screens.

It would be sub-optimal to specify an upgrade to the infrastructure without scaling it for the inevitable video and audio upgrades. Image courtesy of Soloman 203.

Infrastructure is not the place for budget cuts. Meet with the facilities people—lighting, sound, video, and utility usage (communications, security, MNEC)—as well as administration and senior leaders. Jointly imagine the most complex system that the group possibly can. Screens in the lobby, screens in overflow rooms, screens in the cry room, cameras in overflow that can send signal to the video switch, a camera in the cry room, and on and on. Then double it. We never know what will be around the corner.  continued >>

 

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