Posted in news on December 1, 2015 9:35 am EST

Clearing the Air

UV Resources' new UV-Com Control Panel is one resource to improve air quality inside sacred spaces.

Image copyright Eugene Sergeev.


 

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TAGS: health, hvac, operations, sustainability,

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By Keith Loria

“Protecting worshippers from mold is a primary IAQ goal accomplished by ultraviolet germicidal irradiation fixtures in HVAC/R equipment, but these systems have secondary benefits of reducing energy use and lowering HVAC maintenance."

—Dan Jones, President, UV Resources, Santa Clarita, CA

Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation or light in the UV-C wavelength (254nm) has been used extensively in commercial and institutional HVAC systems since the mid-1990s, initially to improve indoor air quality and later, to improve airflow, boost heat exchange efficiency, and reduce necessary maintenance.

The new UV-Com Control Panel from UV Resources based in Santa Clarita, Calif., reportedly provides a convenient means of monitoring multiple Ultraviolet “C” (UV-C) fixtures installed in individual air handling units.

Image courtesy of UV Resources.

Dan Jones, president of UV Resources, says UV-C light is an incredibly effective and affordable technology for keeping critical components of commercial HVAC systems clean and operating to “as-built” specifications for a church.

Building health

“Protecting worshippers from mold is a primary IAQ goal accomplished by ultraviolet germicidal irradiation fixtures in HVAC/R equipment, but these systems have secondary benefits of reducing energy use and lowering HVAC maintenance,” Jones says. “When you think about it, HVAC systems in houses of worship are typically demand-based (on during the day, off in evenings). The moist, organic-rich environment of an HVAC system is an ideal breeding ground for microbial buildup in cooling coils, drain pans and duct surfaces.”

UV-C prevents this buildup, and thereby improves IAQ.

“Moreover, the cost of UVC has dropped considerably in the past decade (roughly 15 cents per cfm), something budget-strapped churches and synagogue’s need to consider,” Jones says. “Most facility managers will see up to a 10-25 percent boost in to an existing HVAC system’s capacity with the addition of UV-C irradiation.”  continued >>

 

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