Posted in news on November 15, 2016 4:11 pm EST

U.S. Navy Opens its First Zero Net Energy Building

A church campus design-applicable Child Development Center in California demonstrates growth investment -- both in children's lives and in efforts toward environmental sustainabilty.

Child Development Center at the USMC base in Twentynine Palms, Calif. Images courtesy of domusstudio architecture of San Diego.


 

ARCHITECTURAL NEWS

 
 

EDITOR PICKS

 
 

LATEST ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION

 
 

NEWSLETTERS

 

Sign up for our bi-monthly newsletter Designer Today to stay up to date with all we do at Designer and with what's going on in the field of house of worship architecture.

 
 
  
          
 

TAGS: architectural design, energy efficiency, environmental sustainability, net zero building, solar,

print

By Church Designer Staff

The Child Development Center (CDC) at the USMC base in Twentynine Palms, Calif., is the Navy’s first Zero Net Energy facility to generate as much renewable electrical energy from its artfully designed photovoltaic tree structures as it consumes over the course of a year from both natural gas and electricity. California’s recent revisions to the Title 24 Energy Code put in place ambitious performance goals where all residential buildings must be Zero Net Energy by 2020, and all commercial buildings must follow suit by 2030. The code also applies to retrofit projects that pass certain thresholds.

The project was the Navy’s first Net–Zero facility, generating as much renewable electrical energy from its artfully designed photovoltaic tree structures as it consumes over the course of a year from both natural gas and electricity.

The CDC’s Child Activity Rooms are organized around a sheltering courtyard plan, oriented to the cardinal North-South-East-West directions, creating a shared outdoor common space protected from the harsh desert environment with intentionally placed views out to the surrounding desert, mountains, and principal landmarks.

Within the courtyard, a shared atelier children’s studio provides an open, light and airy space for children’s creative play and artwork with work-tables, benches, supplies, and exhibit spaces.

Design details

The architectural form of the Twentynine Palms Child Development Center, created by domusstudio architecture of San Diego, responds to the Mojave Desert’s extreme climatic and environmental conditions, providing a variety of shaded and sheltered interior and outdoor spaces designed and constructed with the owner’s stated intention to redefine what Marine Corps families can expect from a Marine Corps Child Care facility.

Design elements were incorporated to offer opportunities for engagement and stimulation of the children’s natural curiosity and capacity for learning both about nature (things growing and responding to the energy of the sun and the rhythmic cycles of the earth) and architecture (exposed structure, various materials, textures and colors, the varying qualities of sound produced by changing ceiling heights within connected interior spaces, and the visual contrasting qualities of sunlight vs. shadow and filtered light vs. shade).

 

 

 

Learn more about the companies in this story:

Domusstudio Architecture

 

 

What people are saying

 

 Add your comment:


Name:
Email:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

 

Please enter the word you see in the image below: