Posted in practice on February 28, 2017 11:37 am EST

Taming Sound & Combatting Noise

Acoustics First Corp. talks issues of taming sound and combatting noise in the church setting--with a look at futuristic acoustic solutions.


 

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TAGS: 3d printing, acoustics, avl design, noise control, product development, research and development,

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By Carol Badaracco Padgett

Acoustics First Corp. of Richmond, Va., has been in the business of acoustics for the past 19 years. But its principals began in the business of acoustics in 1979 and have worked in sound, in general, since long before that.

Nick Colleran, Vice President, Acoustics First Corp.

So Church Designer went straight to the source, Vice President Nick Colleran (guitar player with CBS recording artists The Escorts back in the late 1960s and signed by Clive Davis), to learn what acoustic advancements are on the horizon for 2016. For engineers, consultants and other specifiers working in church sound and acoustics, Colleran’s words may prove golden.

Start out by describing what Acoustics First offers those in the field of church and AVL design.

COLLERAN: Acoustics First offers a full range of acoustical materials to control sound and eliminate noise. In addition to standard and traditional wall panels, traps, fabrics, barriers and sound diffusers, the company holds several patents for acoustical products that it manufactures as part of its Art Diffusor line.

In addition to product offerings, Acoustics First provides suggested solutions to acoustical challenges by evaluating rooms based upon their dimensions, purpose and problems from client-provided observations, photos, and recordings of the sound in the space.

AHEAD OF THE SOUND CURVE | Acoustics First's asymmetrical, 3-D printed Model D diffuses sound over a broad spectrum to create a more uniform acoustical environment for improved sound intelligibility.

This year you made use of 3D printing technology to assist in the development of your new Model D acoustic diffuser, which was patented. Tell us about it. What specific promise does it hold for churches?

COLLERAN: The 3D printing process allowed us to prototype our new product and test the design at reduced cost.

The Model D diffuses sound over a broad spectrum to create a more uniform acoustical environment for improved sound intelligibility. Our website includes a ‘pattern maker’ that allows the user to preview different arrangements of the Model D. It can be accessed at this link: (visit link).

“The 3D printing process allowed us to prototype our new product and test the design at reduced cost."

—Nick Colleran, Vice President, Acoustics First Corp., Richmond, VA

What’s the cost to manufacture? And what else can you offer, in general, about cutting costs in the effort to achieve better acoustics in church spaces?

COLLERAN: The efficiencies in prototyping for testing prior to manufacture have eliminated costs of making molds for designs that might not be viable product.

This new procedure has allowed manufacturing costs to remain stable by shortening development time and making final full-scale molds prior to manufacturing unnecessary and obsolete. Model D price is the same as our Model C, but it is more versatile due to its being asymmetrical.

It is most cost effective to think of 'acoustics first' (the source of our name) in the construction phase rather than to defer (value engineer) acoustics to be addressed down the road. There is a significant savings to be achieved by having a space that accommodates a sound system rather than fights it.  continued >>

 

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