Posted in projects on January 5, 2016 12:56 pm EST

Danley is Chosen to Turn Around Sound at Chicago Church

Beautiful and deeply rooted in history, the Trinity Evangelical Lurtheran Church in Chicago conquers unintelligible sound with Danley Sound Labs' technology, with mics from Countryman and Shure.

Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in Chicago, with a 350-seat sanctuary built in the 1940s, proved to be an acoustically challenging space. Design consultant Advanced Audio & Lighting Systems used an EASE model to help remedy the sound woes.


 

ARCHITECTURAL NEWS

 
 

EDITOR PICKS

 
 

LATEST ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION

 
 

NEWSLETTERS

 

Sign up for our bi-monthly newsletter Designer Today to stay up to date with all we do at Designer and with what's going on in the field of house of worship architecture.

 
 
  
          
 

print
TAGS: acoustics, architectural design, audio upgrade, historic, intelligibility, sound,

print

By Church Designer Staff

The history of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Chicago suburb of Oak Lawn is deep. Founded by German immigrants shortly after the Civil War, the church grew steadily through the 1930s. To accommodate its growth, Trinity constructed a 350-seat sanctuary in 1940 that still serves the church to this day. The Gothic, limestone structure is considerably longer than it is wide, and its stained glass and ornate architecture make it a beautiful and transcendent place to worship.

"The pastor wears a wireless mic and likes to move about to engage the parishioners, and the praise band is positioned in a nook to the side in back of the platform."

—Ryan Winstead, Sales & Design Consultant, Advanced Audio & Lighting Systems, Peoria, IL

These days, Trinity holds two Sunday services, one in a more traditional style and one that’s more contemporary. Although beautiful, the sanctuary has been challenged by unintelligible sound and poor gain-before-feedback. To address these issues, the church called on Peoria, Ill.-based Advanced Audio & Lighting Systems, who solved these problems with "excellent pattern control and point-source purity" of a single Danley Sound Labs SM-96 loudspeaker.

Problem meets solution

“There were several challenges at Trinity Evangelical,” says Ryan Winstead, sales and design consultant at Advanced Audio & Lighting Systems. “The pastor wears a wireless mic and likes to move about to engage the parishioners, and the praise band is positioned in a nook to the side in back of the platform. Regardless, the low-mid energy from the old front-loaded boxes they had been using found its way everywhere and made it impossible to get an open microphone stable at an adequate volume.”

He continues, “They really needed a design that took the acoustics into account, accomplished their goals and would fit into their budget. I did an EASE model to verify loudspeaker coverage, and it quickly became apparent that the most accommodating places to put loudspeakers were already claimed by stained glass, holy symbols, or the projection screen. That screen had the one piece of real estate we would have liked most of all, but they really didn’t have any other place to mount a screen. Truly, the only solution that would give them deep pattern control to energize the seats but not the stage, walls, or ceiling, was a Danley SM-96. It gave us perfect coverage, great fidelity, very efficient output, and worked in the available mounting location.”  continued >>

 

1
2