Posted in projects on June 11, 2014 4:59 pm EDT

Eco-Conscious Design Graces Northern California Church

Episcopal Church of St. John the Baptist features one of the country’s largest rainwater-collection systems.

The new 2.5-acre church campus in Aptos, Calif., features an environmentally conscious first of three phases of expansion. Images courtesy of Form4 Architecture.


 

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TAGS: daylight harvesting, landscaping, rainwater harvesting, sustainability,

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By Church Designer Staff

The project is reported to feature the country’s largest rainwater-collection systems, expected to save 150,000 gallons of water each year—the annual water of two households.

San Francisco-based Form4 Architecture collaborated with design architect Warren Callister to design an eco-conscious building that allows for increased activities, given that additional space was required for musical concerts, social events, and other community engagement initiatives.

The new 2.5-acre church campus located in the Seacliff neighborhood of Aptos, Calif., is an exceedingly environmentally conscious first of three phases of expansion, Form4 representatives report. The campus features drought-tolerant landscaping and other ecologically sustainable aspects, such as the country’s largest rainwater-collection systems, which according to the local water district, is expected to save 150,000 gallons of water each year—the annual water of two households. The rainwater, which is collected on the roof of the new facility and then flows to the tank for storage, will be used for irrigation.

Additional ecological moves include permeable pavement that encourages water to percolate into the ground rather than the storm drain, extensive use of natural lighting throughout the building, and the removal of garbage disposals in the commercial kitchen.

Learn more about Form4 Architecture and its projects here: (visit link)

 

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