Posted in projects on June 26, 2014 4:06 pm EDT

A New York Synagogue Builds Anew

Lincoln Square Synagogue undergoes a six-year, $50-million project to establish a new home -- featuring a 5,000-square-foot glass facade and a 420-seat sanctuary.

Lincoln Square Synagogue, New York. Image courtesy of CetraRuddy Architecture © Theresa Genovese.


 

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By Church Designer Staff

Armed with [a 3D scan of the main space], Moore + Friesl could develop and fabricate a support structure for the metal studs to hang the incoming wood panels around the existing elements.

The Lincoln Square Synagogue project presented some difficulty for architects Moore + Friesl of Los Angeles. After the building was more than two-thirds complete, the firm was tasked with developing custom wood paneling that could be precisely installed into an unusual horseshoe-shaped sanctuary that met a curved, tiered glass wall.

Moore + Friesl needed to locate previously installed ductwork and structural elements installed by the prior contractor, so they commissioned a 3D scan of the main space. This scan provided a 1/8-inch accurate model of the internal components. Armed with this information, Moore + Friesl could develop and fabricate a support structure for the metal studs to hang the incoming wood panels around the existing elements. Without this scan, the panels could never properly fit. They created special templates to position the metal studs, and after the stud framing was installed, the templates were left in place as part of the structure for hanging the special panels. This system allowed for a very accurate installation of the panels on site and, in the end, the team designed 21-foot-high faceted and tilted panels, with average panels 16 feet in height, arranged and fitted tightly in two tiers surrounding around the worship space.

Image courtesy of CetraRuddy Architecture © Theresa Genovese.

The result is stunning, and the Lincoln Square Synagogue was completed as a six-year, $50-million project that has a 5,000-square-foot glass facade and 420-seat sanctuary. The synagogue is reportedly an uplifting space where light streams in through the glass window wall and creates a dynamic visual effect on the faceted panels through different values of light.

Learn more about Moore+Friesl: Architecture+Design: (visit link)

Find out more about the project architect, CetraRuddy Architecture D.P.C. of New York, here: (visit link)

 

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