Posted in projects on June 9, 2014 2:41 pm EDT

St. Paul Parish Experiences a Design Rebirth

Thirteen years of decision making and big construction at a Wisconsin Catholic church results in the renaissance of St. Paul Parish.

All images courtesy of St. Paul Catholic Church in Mosinee, Wis.


 

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TAGS: architecture, design, faith, renovation,

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By Church Designer Staff

The difficulties encountered during the design process were equally matched by those encountered during the construction phase of the project....

St. Paul Parish began fundraising and planning for a new Catholic church for the community of Mosinee, Wis., in 1998. It would take 13 years, however, before the project would be realized. There was a transition in priests, architects, and even Bishops before it was completed. At the heart of the problem was a parish strongly divided between keeping the memories

and history of an existing 1922 church or letting go and building a new church. Several church designs were completed, reviewed, priced, and voted on. Eventually, a design completed in 2009 by Blue Design Group of Hortonville, Wis., broke the impasse and united the congregation with a "contemporical" (contemporary and historical) solution. The proposed church design interwove historical design themes and traditional brick detailing with contemporary materials and layouts on the interior.

The difficulties encountered during the design process were equally matched by those encountered during the construction phase of the project. During the first week of construction, the excavator would be delayed after encountering buried foundations from previous homes and rock at the lowest level of the proposed building. Modifications would be required for underground plumbing before work could progress. Two weeks later, a worker operating a compactor was crushed when it rolled over on him. Fortunately, he was able to make a recovery thanks to the quick actions of the project superintendent on-site. As winter set in, the masonry contractor was forced to utilize temporary heated enclosures to complete work on the bell tower. Bitterly cold temperatures also forced concrete crews to use heat blankets to remove frost from the ground in order to complete concrete floor pours.  continued >>

 

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